Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Pelvic Organ Prolapse Specialist
Pelvic organ prolapse is common in women and the incidence increases after childbearing and as women increase in age. The lifetime risk that a woman will have surgery to correct pelvic organ prolapsed or urinary incontinence is about 11% (one in every 10 women). Located in Austin, Texas, the staff at Central Texas Urogynecology and Continence Center have comprehensive treatment for Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

Pelvic Organ Prolapse Q & A

Central Texas Urogynecology and Continence Center

What is Pelvic Organ Prolapse? 

Pelvic organ prolapse is a medical condition that occurs when there is weakness or damage to the normal support of the pelvic floor. The pelvic organs include the vagina, cervix, uterus, bladder, urethra, bowel and rectum. The pelvic organs are held in place by muscles of the pelvic floor and layers of connective tissue called fascia. Pelvic organ prolapse occurs when the muscles and fascia of the pelvic floor can no longer support the pelvic organs (creating a hernia). This occurs when the muscles and fascia become weakened, stretched, or are torn causing the organs that they support to drop downward.

What are common complaints of women with prolapse?

A bulge near the opening of the vagina or a pressure sensation in their pelvic area that worsens by the end of the day or during bowel movements. The feeling that they are “sitting on a ball” or the need to push stool out of the rectum by placing their fingers into or around the vagina during a bowel movement is another common complaint.

Also, they may experience difficulty starting to urinate and/or emptying the bladder

What are the types of Prolapse?

Cystocele (Anterior vaginal wall prolapse)

This type of prolapse occurs when the supportive tissue or fascia supporting the bladder stretches or detaches from his attachments on the pelvic bones. This loss of support allows the bladder to prolapse or fall down into the vagina.

Rectocele / Enterocele (Posterior wall prolapse)

This type of prolapse occurs when the support tissue or fascia between the vagina and rectum stretches or detaches from its attachment to the pelvic bones. This loss of support allows the rectum or intestines (bowel) to prolapse or fall down into the vagina.

Symptoms of posterior vaginal wall prolapsed typically include a bulge sensation, but women often complain of problems having a bowel movement. Women may have to strain more with bowel movements of have problems with constipation. A common complaint is that women have to put their finger in or around the vagina or rectum to help empty their bowels.

Vaginal Vault Prolapse or Uterine Prolapse

This type of prolapse occurs when the supportive tissue of the cervix and uterus stretches or detaches from its attachment to the ligaments and muscles of the pelvic floor that keep the uterus supported in the pelvis. If a woman has had a hysterectomy, the top part of the vagina (vault) can become detached from the ligaments and muscles of the pelvic floor. When the tissues protrude outside the vagina, it can develop ulcers from rubbing on underwear, sometimes these ulcers will bleed if they become irritated.

 

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